The Dublin Lockout of 1913 stands out as the greatest monument to class division and worker’s rights in modern Irish history. In this powerful and thought-provoking collection, the high-profile list of contributors to The Dublin Lockout, 1913 uncover the radical momentum within Dublin at the time, its effects internationally, and its paramount example in shaping political activism within Ireland to this day.

This book explodes all preconceptions of the Lockout’s legacy, of the beleaguered yet dignified workers who stood up to the greed of their Irish masters, uncovering the truths that were too fraught with trauma, shame and political tension to remain within popular memory-the bloody and bitter animosity that inspired Yeats’s famous refrain, Romantic Ireland’s Dead and Gone.

This vital book reveals the immediate impact of the industrial dispute, but also its enduring lessons through the First World War, the Easter Rising, the birth of the Irish Free State and how it governs activism today. Only now, in this book, is the pivotal class war recognized for what it was: inspiring, shocking, and the nearest thing Ireland had to a debate on the type of society that was wanted by its citizens. [Subject: History, Labor History, Irish Studies, Dublin]

This landmark publication has been designed to empower researchers, school, community and heritage groups, and indeed, anyone with an interest in Galway history and the independence struggle in Ireland. Comprising a detailed guide to beginning the research journey and navigating a complex array of archives, newspapers and other official sources, this book will be an invaluable aid to carrying out historical research for anyone interested in the momentous events that shaped our society over one hundred years ago. Presented in an approachable format, this publication will be an vital tool for generations of researchers interested in exploring events in County Galway during a tumultuous period in our history.

The author is Galway Historian-in-Residence, Dr Conor McNamara. Dr McNamara has published five books on the history of the Irish revolution and has been the recipient of a number of national awards. In 2009, he was awarded the annual National Library of Ireland, History Fellowship. In 2015 he was awarded the NUI Galway, 1916 Scholar-in-Residence. He has also been a visiting fellow at the Moore Institute for the Humanities at NUI Galway. In 2017, he published his fourth book, War and Revolution in the West of Ireland, Galway 1913~22 with Irish Academic Press. He has contributed to numerous collections, including the landmark publication, The Atlas of the Irish Revolution (Cork University Press). His latest study, Liam Mellows, Soldier of the Irish Republic, Selected Writings, 1914~22 was recently published by Irish Academic Press. He has taught at NUI Galway and the University of Minnesota, Dublin Study Centre. He is originally from Athenry, County Galway,

This landmark new study of the life of Republican leader Liam Mellows gathers letters, speeches, articles and IRA documents from archives in Ireland, the UK and the United States together for the first time to form an insightful analysis of Mellows’ short but intense life. It examines his beliefs, fraught personal relationships, political betrayals and intrigue, and his struggle in the face of seemingly overwhelming odds. Mellows was at the forefront of the Republican movement from its inception. After the Easter Rebellion, he spent four years as the representative of the IRA in the United States, but his time there was deeply unhappy: jailed in the infamous Tombs Prison while his comrades dithered over his bail, he was also branded an informer by the Mayor of New York. Back in Ireland in 1920, Mellows was responsible for buying and distributing arms during the War of Independence. Bitterly opposed to the Anglo-Irish Treaty, he was a key opponent of Michael Collins, and his role in occupying the Four Courts in June 1922 was central to the outbreak of the Civil War. His execution by the Free State in December 1922 was one of the most divisive moments in the foundation of the state, and he remains an enigmatic icon for Irish republicans.

“The people generally are out for a Republic and they propose to get it.”-County Inspector RIC, West Galway, July 1920 *** The period 1913-22 witnessed extraordinary upheaval in Irish society. The Easter Rising of 1916 facilitated the emergence of new revolutionary forces and the eruption of guerrilla warfare. In Galway and elsewhere in the west, the new realities wrought by World War One saw the emergence of a younger generation of impatient revolutionaries. In 1916, Liam Mellows led his Irish Volunteers in a Rising in east Galway, and up to 650 rebels took up defensive positions at Moyode Castle. From the western shores of Connemara to market towns such as Athenry, Tuam, and Galway, local communities were subject to unprecedented use of terror by the Crown Forces. Meanwhile, conflict over land, an enduring grievance of the poor, threatened to overwhelm parts of Galway with sustained land seizures and cattle drives by the rural population. War and Revolution in the West of Ireland: Galway, 1913-1922 provides fascinating insights into the revolutionary activities of the ordinary men and women who participated in the struggle for independence. In this compelling new account, Galway historian Conor McNamara unravels the complex web of identity and allegiance that characterised the west of Ireland, exploring the enduring legacy of a remarkable and contested era. (Subject: Irish Studies, History, Military History)

At the height of the Land War in 1881, a dispute over land led to the fatal shooting of a young man called Peter Doherty near Craughwell, Co Galway. Intense police investigations discovered two informers whose perjured testimony before packed juries resulted in the conviction of two innocent men, Patrick Finnegan and Constable Michael Muldowney.

This book features a forensic analysis of the trials that resulted in such a grave miscarriage of justice. Original research in primary sources has uncovered the role of informers, the payments made to them and their eventual ‘disposal’ by the Dublin Castle authorities. Following commutation of the death sentences, each of the prisoners served a term of twenty years penal servitude and the became known as the ‘Craughwell Prsioners’. The experiences of the prisoners in Mountjoy and Maryborough jails are revealed from the prison files, which also contain their heartfelt pleas for release and pardon, and affirmations of their innocence.

Dr Paul McNamara

This book examines the ‘Recovered Territories’ which came to Poland from Germany following the Second World War. In particular, looks at Sovietisation and the levels of conflict and compromise between ordinary Poles and the communist regime in Poland’s settlement of its coastal provinces between 1945 and 1956.This book examines the ‘Recovered Territories’ which came to Poland from Germany following the Second World War. In particular, looks at Sovietisation and the levels of conflict and compromise between ordinary Poles and the communist regime in Poland’s settlement of its coastal provinces between 1945 and 1956.

Other publications by Dr McNamara

‘The Free City of Danzig’s rejection of its hinterland, as seen through events concerning the League of Nations and Danzig, 1933-1937’ (in press)‘The Free City of Danzig’s rejection of its hinterland, as seen through events concerning the League of Nations and Danzig, 1933-1937’ (in press)
in Robert Lee (Ed.) Port-Cities and their Hinterlands: Migration, Trade and Cultural Exchange from the early seventeenth-century to 1939, · Jan 1, 2018in Robert Lee (Ed.) Port-Cities and their Hinterlands: Migration, Trade and Cultural Exchange from the early seventeenth-century to 1939, · Jan 1, 2018

‘A Tragedy of European Concern’ – The conflict between Sean Lester, High Commissioner of the League of Nations and Danzig’s Nazi Senate, 1934-1937,’ ‘A Tragedy of European Concern’ – The conflict between Sean Lester, High Commissioner of the League of Nations and Danzig’s Nazi Senate, 1934-1937,’
Symbolae Europaeae, vol. 9/2016 · Jan 1, 2016Symbolae Europaeae, vol. 9/2016 · Jan 1, 2016

‘Sean Lester, Liga Narodów i Polska w Wolnym Mieście Gdańsku, 1934 – 1937’ in Polska-Irlandia: Wspólna historia?‘Sean Lester, Liga Narodów i Polska w Wolnym Mieście Gdańsku, 1934 – 1937’ in Polska-Irlandia: Wspólna historia?
Instytut Historii, UAM, Poznan · Dec 1, 2015Instytut Historii, UAM, Poznan · Dec 1, 2015

‘Competing National and Regional Identities in Poland’s Baltic “Recovered Territories”, 1945-1956’: Communism, Nationalism and State Building in Post-War Europe, History of Communism in Europe, vol. III/2012‘Competing National and Regional Identities in Poland’s Baltic “Recovered Territories”, 1945-1956’: Communism, Nationalism and State Building in Post-War Europe, History of Communism in Europe, vol. III/2012
Zeta Books, Bucharest · Jan 1, 2012Zeta Books, Bucharest · Jan 1, 2012

Sean Lester’, entry in Encyklopedia Gdańska‘Sean Lester’, entry in Encyklopedia Gdańska
Fundacja Gdańska · Jan 1, 2012Fundacja Gdańska · Jan 1, 2012

‘Sean Lester and Polish Foreign Policy, 1934-1937’ in Sabine Egger and John McDonough (Eds.) Polish –Irish Encounters’Sean Lester and Polish Foreign Policy, 1934-1937’ in Sabine Egger and John McDonough (Eds.) Polish –Irish Encounters 2011Peter Lang: Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien · Jan 1, 2011

‘Could this Irishman have stopped Hitler?’, History Ireland (Cover story) May 1, 2009May 1, 2009

Sean Lester, Poland and the Nazi Takeover of Danzig 
Irish Academic Press, Dublin and Portland · Jan 1, 2009Irish Academic Press, Dublin and Portland · Jan 1, 2009

HISTORICAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION:
Simanjiro – Emboret Catholic Mission is situated to the south east of the Archdiocese of Arusha along Simanjiro plains bordering Tharangire National Game Reserve. This mission is one of the oldest parishes in the Archdiocese of Arusha and it was set up in the early 1950s. Initially the Parish covered the entire civil and administrative district of Simanjiro situated in Arusha Region in the northern part of Tanzania. Currently, due to administrative changes Simanjiro – Emboret Mission falls under the new Manyara Region, which was created early in the year 2002.

The entire parish covers an area of about 4900 kms2 and is situated to the South West of Arusha town 120km along the Arusha – Kiteto road. The area has a total population of about 96,000 and a majority of them are Roman Catholics. 90% of the population are Maasai by tribe and nomad- pastoralists by occupation. The entire area of Simanjiro plains has a grassland savannah type of climate with a lot of wild life as well as domestic animals grazing side by side.

Since its foundation in 1950s, Simanjiro Catholic Mission has striven to promote Christian faith through evangelisation and Integral human development, through establishment of hospital, schools and water projects. Currently, the entire Parish community covers more than 19 villages or outstations and on the one side furthest is Komolo about 60kms east of the main station and the furthest on the other side Kimotorok approximately 78km South of the main station.

The Persse family, believed to be related to the powerful Percy family of Northumberland, England, is descended from the Revd Robert Persse, a ‘man of God’, who arrived in Ireland before 1602 ‘to preach the Gospel’. His grandson, the Revd Dudley received a grant of lands from King Charles II, and he established the first Persse family estate at Spring Garden, Tynagh, Co: Galway, in 1677.

Being of Protestant ascendancy class, Persse family members were not universally popular. However, several descendants, such as Henry Stratford Persse, Isabella August Persse – Lady Gregory, and Capt John Shawe-Taylor, proved to be atypical of their class. In time, despite bankruptcy and decades of litigation concerning the Castleboy estate, descendants of the early landed families became particularly influential in the commercial, social, sporting and political life of Galway city and county. Many other descendants emigrated to England, Scotland, Canada, the United Sates, Africa, Australia and New Zealand.

Today, apart from the once-renowned Persse Whiskey enterprise and the literary legacy of Lady Gregory, the intriguing and sometimes controversial history of the Persse family is relatively unknown.

About the book: This is a local history book that contains a substantial amount of information that is of interest to family historians. It charts the history of the Parish of Kiltullagh/Killimordaly (a rural Parish in east County Galway) from about 1500 to about 1900. Articles have been contributed by a number of people, most of whom are from the Parish. This approach has the advantage of drawing on local knowledge from different parts of the Parish, maximising the input of primary research and providing different writing styles which makes the book more interesting. While the articles are related, each one is independent and can be read without reference to the rest of the book. This encourages interest in the book as it can be read in small sections.

Kiltullagh/Killimordaly Historical Society, 2000 – Galway (Ireland : County) – 378 pages