Weather lore of the West of Ireland

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Trí lá na Sean Bhó Riabhaigh” – ‘The Three Days of the Ould Speckled Cow’ 

Folklore tells us that the old cow was dying from the hardship of the winter but the month of March was not happy that it couldn’t finish it off before its end so it borrowed three days for April to do the job. Because of this the first three, normally cold wet, days of April are traditionally called ‘The Three Days of the Ould Speckled Cow’

Garbhshín na gCuach – The “Bad Weather of the Cuckoo”

The “Bad Weather of the Cuckoo” is the name normally given to the first fortnight in May as the weather is usually wet and windy at this time. This can be a difficult time for the fruit farmers especially those who grow apples as the wind blows the apple blossoms away and this results in a low yield.

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Written by Finbarr O'Regan

Published here 09 Feb 2021

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